Mike Naylor (Spain)

Feeling Cancer

MS David

MS David

CU Peter

CU Peter

MS Ana

MS Ana

CU Sam

CU Sam

WS-Cass

WS Cass

CU Ana

CU Ana

MS Barbara

MS Barbara

CU Barbara

CU Barbara

WS Peter

WS Peter

WS Ted

WS Ted

MS Sam

MS Sam

CU Cass

CU Cass

WS Ana

WS Ana

WS David

WS David

WS Barbara

WS Barbara

MS Cass

MS Cass

CU Ted

CU Ted

MS Peter

MS Peter

WS-Sam

WS Sam

MS Ted

MS Ted

CU David

CU David

I was awarded an RPS Fellowship Distinction for this Contemporary Panel of 21 images.

The Statement Of Intent

People often feel lonely, but none more so than those touched by cancer. Whether it be those who might die, or the ones left behind, many will see their friends and neighbours drift away. As if unable to find the right words, the unaffected will suddenly have other, more important things to do.

Being touched by cancer can bring about an overwhelming feeling of despair. For those living alone, many will find themselves isolated. The comfort of home provides a safe place to hide, but with their friends gone, life will become boring and repetitive. They become detached from their surroundings, floating aimlessly, merely existing, and without purpose. Simple decisions, what to eat or where to sit, become harder. It’s a downward spiral. Some knowing their life is nearing an end. The bereaved, forever recounting the suffering they once shared.

The photographs, intended to stress similarities, are also repetitive – as is the feeling of social isolation. But the order in which they are displayed, breaks the expected, adding texture to the underlaying structure, enticing the eye to wander. Attention is extended, providing time to connect with the issue, whilst resolving the triptychs. I hope this explains why it was necessary to exceed the number of prints normally required and why the stylisation is so consistent.

Feeling cancer is an issue I deal with – much like the seven subjects seen here. I chose to depict that loneliness without cliché, but organically, in a way that would convey emotional detachment. It is my contribution to help in raising public awareness. Loneliness should not be an inevitable consequence.

Mike Naylor - September 2014